Tag Archives: ArtsEdTech

“One Flat Thing, Reproduced” website

Name of the website: Synchronous Objects

Cost: Free!

About the website: the website is multi-faceted, and highlights the choreographic work “One Flat Thing, Reproduced” by William Forsythe. The web pages are incredibly interactive and will mesmerize any teen dance student.

Possible classroom applications: Certain aspects of the website discuss the interaction between the dancers, which directly ties into “Relationship” within the BSTER concept. Students can add and remove the soundscore, voice-over of the choreographer, but also change perspective of the work. Students can explore the concept of kinesphere learn more about the choreographic process. It includes a range of other art forms, so is also a wonderful way to connect to other art disciplines

I have used this as a base for dialogic classroom conversation, but also homework assignments. The list of classroom applications is endless.

Pros: Children are obsessed with technology, and if anything will pull them into learning more about the culture, history, and future of dance, it’s this website. It’s interactive, and offers multiple ways into the work. Because of the multiple entry points and the fact that the site is visual and aural, there are myriad of ways to learn about the arts (and its connection to technology.

Cons: The website needs a lot of VRAM to operate, so it might take a while to load or have glitches when visiting it from an older computer. It might also be too overwhelming for ELLs or students with more severe cases of ADD/ ADHD. A way around it would be to look at the content with guidance of an adult.

Rating: 6 out of 5 (yes, it’s that good!)

Ballet Index- one of many language tools for dance.

Name of Application: Ballet Index

Cost: 99 Cents

Pros: Gives both the literal translation of ballet vocabulary and also what it refers to in terms of ballet class and terminology. Gives phonetic pronunciations.

Cons: Not many photos of what things look like, though entries like ballerina have cheesy photos of a “ballerina.”

I use this app for my own knowledge of how to exactly translate and spell terms in ballet and in other styles of dance as we use ballet vocabulary throughout many dance forms. I use these terms with my pre-K students and my Middle School students. Using terms based in the French language is helpful at my job because many of my students are bi-lingual in French and English or are English Language Learners. This allows us to discuss cross-cultural use of language and other uses for their mother tongue.

I recommend this App, it is a clear interface and very well laid out and very clear. However, I think that the free ballet dictionary that is available through the American Ballet Theater, (http://www.abt.org/education/dictionary/), is a bit more comprehensive and clear. This website would be more useable by students on their own for defining and spelling ballet vocabulary because of its accessibility on the computer as well as the fact that it is free. Ballet Index is only 99 cents, but not all students have their own iPad or iPhone access or want to/can afford to buy an app for dance class (students would also need parental permission to buy their own version of applications).

Number of Stars * * * (3/5 stars)

Great app to connect Dance to ELA: Dance Writer!

My first unit plan for a recent set of students in the Bronx focused on devising movement. Since many students never had dance before being in my classroom, I wanted to create an experience that made them feel accomplished while building on their prior knowledge. Many of these students had expressed their passion for ELA and mobile devices during my initial assessment of their interests, so for my first few lessons I focused on connecting dance to writing words in both cursive as well as typed font.

I found a terrific app that provided my pupils with confidence and excitement. The app, called Dance Writer, is an easy-to-use app designed by Typotheque that functions on both iPad and iPhone platforms. Simply put, the app converts text into a choreographed sequence of poses based on the shapes of the letters, enabling users to send animated messages to their friends via email, or just enjoy the graceful movement on their own displays.

The app has limitations, and only can change fourteen characters at a time into movement. A second less exciting aspect is the fact that the virtual dancer returns to the neutral position after each executed letter. Conversely, this could provide the class with a worthy scaffolding opportunity into choreographing their own transitions between “movement letters.”

The app costs $2.99, and is definitely worth every penny. If you’re not convinced, or just wish to use it on a less frequent basis, you can also use the application online by clicking here. This free online version allows more than fourteen characters at a time, and offers the user to make changes while the letters are being executed. The online platform is also the best way to use the application on your smart-board.

I give Dance Writer 4 out of 5 stars, since it provided my students with an interesting and enriching experience. This app has a lot of potential, but should definitely be cheaper than the offered price, especially considering it’s offered for free online.

Spotlight on ArtsEdTech & Jessica Wilt

On this #TechTuesday, we celebrate Jessica Wilt, an innovator in the arts, technology, and community building!

Jessica.Wilt

Jessica is a dancer, arts education advocate, and the founder of ArtsEdTechNYC, “a group for artists and performing artists, educators in K-12 and higher ed, teaching artists, arts & culture or recreational organizations, technology enthusiasts, entrepreneurs and anyone interested in the intersection of the arts with education and technology.”

Through monthly #ArtsEdTech Tuesday gatherings (the first Tuesday of each month at the Centre for Social Innovation) and #ArtsEdTech Thursdays (a moderated panel series at Apple SoHo), ArtsEdTechNYC has been cultivating a community of forward-thinking arts educators to spark conversation, share ideas, and help nurture the growing connections between the arts and technology.

In her recent feature in the New Learning Times, Jessica discussed her vision for the group: “I launched ArtsEdTechNYC a year ago as a platform for people to network, exchange ideas and learn from others who are using technology in successful, meaningful ways with arts education being the anchor. I continue to be inspired by the connections that are being made, the stories that are being shared, and hope the future of ArtsEdTech becomes a virtual platform for those in the arts, education, and tech fields to collaborate and learn from each other, especially teaching best practices and professional development modeling.”

We applaud Jessica for her work within the New York City arts community and encourage all of you to join the ArtsEdTech Meetup Group for up-to-date information on their latest events.

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Jessica Wilt can be found on the web at www.jessicawilt.com and @JessicaLWilt

ArtsEdTech NYC can be found at www.artsedtechnyc.com,  @ArtsEdTechNYCFacebook, and their Meetup Group