Tag Archives: balletvocabulary

“Ballet Lite/Ballet Index” by Cannonade

Price: Lite=Free; Index=$0.99

App Overview: This app is a Ballet dictionary with over 200 terms. Some of the terms have corresponding photos. There is a also a flash card feature to test yourself. The only difference between the free version and the paid version is that the paid version loads the information onto your phone so there is no need to have internet connection to access the app where as the free one does not permanently “live” on your device.

Pros: It is a relatively large and useful index of terms with some cross-reference where it links one definition to another. It also often includes a literal translation and a description of the movement.

Cons: I wish all the movements had a corresponding photo for visual learners.

Overall: There are many ballet terms that are not included in this app but its is often updated by the developer to include more terms and definitions. It is a handy reference for those who have familiarity with ballet terminology.

 

“One Flat Thing, Reproduced” website

Name of the website: Synchronous Objects

Cost: Free!

About the website: the website is multi-faceted, and highlights the choreographic work “One Flat Thing, Reproduced” by William Forsythe. The web pages are incredibly interactive and will mesmerize any teen dance student.

Possible classroom applications: Certain aspects of the website discuss the interaction between the dancers, which directly ties into “Relationship” within the BSTER concept. Students can add and remove the soundscore, voice-over of the choreographer, but also change perspective of the work. Students can explore the concept of kinesphere learn more about the choreographic process. It includes a range of other art forms, so is also a wonderful way to connect to other art disciplines

I have used this as a base for dialogic classroom conversation, but also homework assignments. The list of classroom applications is endless.

Pros: Children are obsessed with technology, and if anything will pull them into learning more about the culture, history, and future of dance, it’s this website. It’s interactive, and offers multiple ways into the work. Because of the multiple entry points and the fact that the site is visual and aural, there are myriad of ways to learn about the arts (and its connection to technology.

Cons: The website needs a lot of VRAM to operate, so it might take a while to load or have glitches when visiting it from an older computer. It might also be too overwhelming for ELLs or students with more severe cases of ADD/ ADHD. A way around it would be to look at the content with guidance of an adult.

Rating: 6 out of 5 (yes, it’s that good!)

Memory King!

Name of the application: Memory King

Cost: Free, with additional in-app purchases of $0.99 each

About the app: The app is an app version of the classic card game Memory. The platform is free, and there are many adaptions possible to tailor to diverse age groups and their corresponding needs. In settings you can fluctuate the number of card sets from 2 to 32 pairs, and the reveal time can also be adjusted from one second to five. The version offers memory cards of animals and toys, but decks can also be self-created by the user. There are additional decks available as an in-app purchase for $0.99 each. These decks are all highly educational, and consist out of numbers, letters, shapes, colors, fruits, and musical instruments.

The app functions on both the iPad and iPhone, and can be used for one or four players. Memory King has two “wild cards.” The first is Total Recall, which once more reveals the cards that have been turned in the game. Crystal Ball, the second “wild card,” shows all cards in the game. These two enticing cards can be omitted out of the game in the settings.

Possible classroom applications: The customization option of this game offers a great opportunity for educators to give their students a playful entry point to learn content-specific words. It could be applied in ELA classes, math units, and of course the arts! Yesterday, I created a card set of ballet terms that my dance students have learned over the last few weeks, and just had a first trial run with them. I linked the iPad to the smart-board, so the pictures looked bigger than on the iPad. The students loved the interactive aspect of the smart-board, and it was a playful way to reiterate key ballet definitions. Like in the real game, students take turns, and the child who wins the most (virtual) cards wins! I used laminated gold stars as a tangible substitute for each matching pair made.

Having a distinct knowledge of the ballet idiom is essential for every dance student, but since learning ballet jargon can be perceived as a tedious task for dance students, the game offered a covert way to get the proverbial job done! The game offers audio and visual hints offering support for ELLs and other children that need strong aural and visual supports. Again, the reveal time can also easily be adjusted. This, and the opportunity to adjust the number of cards make the game suitable for all age groups.

Lastly, it’s important to note that the game doesn’t only (covertly) build and reiterates the ballet (or other) vocabulary of the participants, but also aids in the overall retention skills.

Pros: The app can be adapted in many ways, which makes it a great tool for all ages. The number of decks, the reveal time, and presence of the “wild cards” can all be altered. Additionally, the audio and visual hints tailor to students varied intelligences (i.e., music, spatial, linguistic, kinesthetic).

Cons: Unfortunately, the created decks can’t be shared between different devices or between users.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5

Ballet Index- one of many language tools for dance.

Name of Application: Ballet Index

Cost: 99 Cents

Pros: Gives both the literal translation of ballet vocabulary and also what it refers to in terms of ballet class and terminology. Gives phonetic pronunciations.

Cons: Not many photos of what things look like, though entries like ballerina have cheesy photos of a “ballerina.”

I use this app for my own knowledge of how to exactly translate and spell terms in ballet and in other styles of dance as we use ballet vocabulary throughout many dance forms. I use these terms with my pre-K students and my Middle School students. Using terms based in the French language is helpful at my job because many of my students are bi-lingual in French and English or are English Language Learners. This allows us to discuss cross-cultural use of language and other uses for their mother tongue.

I recommend this App, it is a clear interface and very well laid out and very clear. However, I think that the free ballet dictionary that is available through the American Ballet Theater, (http://www.abt.org/education/dictionary/), is a bit more comprehensive and clear. This website would be more useable by students on their own for defining and spelling ballet vocabulary because of its accessibility on the computer as well as the fact that it is free. Ballet Index is only 99 cents, but not all students have their own iPad or iPhone access or want to/can afford to buy an app for dance class (students would also need parental permission to buy their own version of applications).

Number of Stars * * * (3/5 stars)