Tag Archives: education

iDanceEd App Review from Carmel B

Name of Application: Common Core

 Cost: FREE

Pros:  Accessible, Convenient

Cons: N/A

For two years, I have been using this app, from my phone or iPad, while creating lesson plans at home or school. It’s easy to use because you can search keywords from your lesson plan and it will list standards that consists of the keywords you entered. It’s convenient because you can use the app for a quick search to reference standards. It’s a great app to use!

Number of Stars, *****5

 

Puzzle Maker

Name of the website: Puzzle Maker – Discoveryeducation.com

Cost: Free!

About the website: the website is a great platform for anyone – dance educators, parents, or other – to create word search puzzles from scratch. The website application only needs you to insert the words and puzzle size, and… VOILA!

Possible classroom applications: The site offers a platform that enables you to make these puzzles from scratch. This means that teachers can have these puzzles match learning content and give this to their students as homework assignments. A second alternative is for teachers to create these puzzles for substitute teachers. As dance teachers we all know that substitutes generally don’t teach in our content area, so this is a worthy alternative.

Pros: The word search puzzle can be created to match your content area and current unit plan. Also, the puzzles can be created to match the cognitive level of the students, so it can be applied over the entire K-12 spectrum.

Cons: I’ve run into problems creating longer compound words (e.g., grand plié, grand battement). These are separated at all times, and using commas between these words doesn’t work. This may limit the word bank during the creation of the puzzle.

Rating: 3 out of 5

Pinterest!

Name of the application: Pinterest

About the app:
Pinterest is most likely not the first app you think about when looking for educational dance resources, but it has proven to be an extremely helpful resource over the past months to me. As many of you probably know, Pinterest is a visual bookmarking tool that exists in website and app format.

Possible classroom applications:
Pinterest is a great resource to search for rubrics, explore classroom management or lesson plan ideas, discover ways to differentiate lessons, and find acrostics or photos to post in your classroom. There are endless topics one can research in dance education. Additionally, middle and high school students could use this app as part of  research projects.

Pros:
The app is free to use, and to see content you don’t need an account. Also, it’s easy to create a board (a group of images, videos, or websites) to send to students’ email addresses. This will provide the class with a specific bank of research material.

Cons:
The app and website don’t offer safety features that block sexually explicit content, therefore it’s essential to monitor usage for students during classroom activities. Also, when connected to other social network sites, it’s easy to be distracted by people’s posts.

Rating:
3 out of 5

Easy-To-Use Common Core State Standards App!

As public school educators we all have to adhere to the Common Core State Standards, and matching your lesson plan to a corresponding standard can sometimes feel like trying to find a needle in a haystack.

I have looked at a myriad of Common Core State Standard apps, and found that CommonCore   designed for iPad and iPhone platforms, is the most user-friendly of them all. Not only does the (free) app include the traditional and integrated Mathematics and Language Arts, but it also contains the newer History/ Social Studies and Science & Technical Subjects standards. No other app does so!

The application designers, MasteryConnect, have done a great job here, and the most impressive element is the search engine that allows you to type in any key words that might help align your unit with the standard. Also, the additional resources for Math, ELA, as well as ELL and SPED application are unparalleled. There is no easier way to link to the CCSS, since it’s free and usable while offline.

I must note that the iPad version of the app is more user-friendly than the iPhone version. When looking at the Standards on the iPhone you don’t have a good overview on the iPhone. Also, the resources are not available online, which can be a challenge when you’re on the go and wish to look at these materials.

Whenever I create my lesson plans, I always have this app at hand. It has helped me save time and energy though using the nifty search engine. Download it now, and use the time saved by using this A+ (5 out of 5 stars) app to sharpen your pencils or ponder over color-coordinating your classroom materials!

Spotlight on ArtsEdTech & Jessica Wilt

On this #TechTuesday, we celebrate Jessica Wilt, an innovator in the arts, technology, and community building!

Jessica.Wilt

Jessica is a dancer, arts education advocate, and the founder of ArtsEdTechNYC, “a group for artists and performing artists, educators in K-12 and higher ed, teaching artists, arts & culture or recreational organizations, technology enthusiasts, entrepreneurs and anyone interested in the intersection of the arts with education and technology.”

Through monthly #ArtsEdTech Tuesday gatherings (the first Tuesday of each month at the Centre for Social Innovation) and #ArtsEdTech Thursdays (a moderated panel series at Apple SoHo), ArtsEdTechNYC has been cultivating a community of forward-thinking arts educators to spark conversation, share ideas, and help nurture the growing connections between the arts and technology.

In her recent feature in the New Learning Times, Jessica discussed her vision for the group: “I launched ArtsEdTechNYC a year ago as a platform for people to network, exchange ideas and learn from others who are using technology in successful, meaningful ways with arts education being the anchor. I continue to be inspired by the connections that are being made, the stories that are being shared, and hope the future of ArtsEdTech becomes a virtual platform for those in the arts, education, and tech fields to collaborate and learn from each other, especially teaching best practices and professional development modeling.”

We applaud Jessica for her work within the New York City arts community and encourage all of you to join the ArtsEdTech Meetup Group for up-to-date information on their latest events.

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Jessica Wilt can be found on the web at www.jessicawilt.com and @JessicaLWilt

ArtsEdTech NYC can be found at www.artsedtechnyc.com,  @ArtsEdTechNYCFacebook, and their Meetup Group

Things to Learn

I just learned about the iPad app “Things To Learn” geared for students and teachers. My professor introduced this app to our Dance Methods class while drafting a Hip Hop Lesson. It is so much fun to play around with the different symbols and flip through content areas. A teacher is able to create a test for almost any age and level of learner. The visuals and content are also very child friendly and could give students a more positive association with the word quiz or test. The “Things To Learn” app would also work well for parents in developing new learning skills for their younglings.

Duolingo, Inspiration, and Whiteboard!

Duolingo – This app is great because it teaches you another language. I think it’s useful because as a teacher you would have students whose second language is English, so it might be difficult for us to communicate. Using an app that can help both the teacher and student communicate is always important because it’ll make it easier for the student to learn along with the rest of their class.

Inspiration – This app is great for teachers who want to use a visual aid to help with breaking down content for their students. It is also useful for students who might want to write an essay but don’t know where to start. This can serve as a map planner/guider.

Whiteboard – This app is a great alternative to drawing with only pencil and paper. There are multiple colors and different sizes of boldness in the writing. Students can use this app when creating art, but digitally.

Access4Kids input device allows disabled children to control touch-centric tablets

Limited mobility access to computers has been closely addressed in the past decade. Now it’s the tablet’s turn to become even more user friendly.  Video and Engadget article linked below.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mc6eygC5eQ8&w=560&h=315]

http://www.engadget.com/2012/12/11/access4kids-input-device-tablet-control-disabled-video/